Unrealistic about your car needs

Many car shoppers grossly overestimate their needs. Instead of buying a car that reflects their actual driving experience, they buy a vehicle that feeds their future plans or perceived future needs. For instance, a buyer who plans to own a boat and trailer may buy an SUV or heavy pickup. But he does not own the boat 88์นด. Overall, it’s best to buy a vehicle for your present needs, not your future desires.

Not calculating the true cost of a hybrid

Hybrid vehicles, like the Prius, are priced far above a regular gas or diesel. When you subtract the cost of the regular vehicle from the hybrid price, you’ll see the premium you pay for the hybrid. Now, will the fuel savings pay for themselves over the number of months you own the vehicle? Hardly ever! Most times you’ll pay more overall for a hybrid vehicle. Gas and diesel vehicles are becoming more and more efficient. Remember, over 50% of the vehicles in all of Europe have diesel engines, and it’s been that way for 50 years. Must be a reason, eh?

. Not shopping for car insurance before the car purchase

Here’s a big no-no. How many times have you called your insurance agent and gotten a quote on the car you WANT to buy? If you’re upgrading from an average car to a different kind of car…like going from a Toyota Altima to a Corvette…the increase in insurance premiums could make the new car purchase unaffordable. Unfortunately, most people find this out AFTER they buy that shiny new car. But just going from an older car to a new car could drastically increase your insurance costs. What if your old car didn’t have collision coverage, but your new car will? That could mean hundreds of dollars in added premiums.

Talking trade-in during negotiations for the new car purchase

Don’t include trade-in for your old car in the new car deal. It’s too easy for the car dealer to structure your deal to look like you’re getting much more for your trade-in. Make your car deal apart from any trade-in consideration. Then, get the trade-in offer and deduct it from the total. Also give serious consideration to selling your old car yourself. You’ll get much more money for your old car.

Dealer financing

This is a mine field, and the dealers have set the mines in your path. The most dangerous place in a dealership is the Finance and Insurance (F&I) office. The F&I office accounts for a big percentage of the total profits of a dealership. You must be wary of every offer here…financing, warranty, insurances like life insurance that pays off your loan balance. I recommend that you decline everything offered from an F&I office except a low interest rate on a loan of no more than 36 months.

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